Someone with too much freetime

Included content contains fandoms (snk, superwholock, dexter) and odd humor. Occasional nsfw, m/m pairing, gay angels flying all over the place, etc.

Occasionally personal posts.

Does free art commissions.

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I have too much free time.
Reblogged from poetrycatsandmusic  9,605 notes

angerinyourbones:

Study after study after study shows that spanking children causes anger, aggression, decreased impulse control, anxiety, lower thresholds for frustration etc etc

You didn’t “turn out just fine” because you were smacked, you turned out “just fine” IN SPITE of it.

I also wouldn’t call someone who thinks violence against children is okay “just fine” but.. Y’know.

Reblogged from lookatthisstory  541 notes

lookatthisstory:

Two wars, two veterans, both homeless. Henry Addington, 67, served with the Navy in Vietnam and Dan Martin, 29, was a medic in Afghanistan.

If you ask them, homeless veterans might tell you they only have a vague idea of what they look like, or how they got to where they are. At least that was true of the few we met in San Diego.

There are about 50,000 homeless vets in the U.S., according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Veterans who have struggled with drug use or mental illness, unemployment or criminal records — or any number of things.

NPR spoke with Henry, Dan and 7 other veterans in a pop-up portrait studio at Stand Down San Diego. Find out what they had to say.

Reblogged from nyrbclassics  93 notes
nyrbclassics:

We’re saddened by the death this week of Alastair Reid, a poet, translator, traveler, and children’s book author. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. He translated Borges and Neruda and published more than forty books, among them a wordbook for children, Ounce Dice Trice (with drawings by Ben Shahn), published by The New York Review Children’s Collection. Reid died on Sunday, September 21, at age eighty-eight. 

The image above is from Reid’s splendidly weird book of speculations, Supposing (with illustrations by his sometime collaborator Bob Gill).

nyrbclassics:

We’re saddened by the death this week of Alastair Reid, a poet, translator, traveler, and children’s book author. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. He translated Borges and Neruda and published more than forty books, among them a wordbook for children, Ounce Dice Trice (with drawings by Ben Shahn), published by The New York Review Children’s Collection. Reid died on Sunday, September 21, at age eighty-eight. 

The image above is from Reid’s splendidly weird book of speculations, Supposing (with illustrations by his sometime collaborator Bob Gill).